RAMADAN HELPLINE: Have Questions? Send Imam Tariq an email today!

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Ramadan Workshop by Imam Tariq Rasheed

Almighty Allah said "Oh you who believe Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may (learn) self-restraint."

Zakat Workshop by Imam Tariq

Zakat is one of the five pillars of Islam. As such, it is compulsory on Muslims, provided they meet certain conditions and criteria. Any Muslim who possesses the required nisaab (the minimum amount of wealth that one must have before zakat is payable) for one whole year is bound to pay Zakat on that wealth.

To donate your zakat, please make your check payable to Islamic Center of Orlando and write "Zakat" in the memo. You can drop the check in the zakat box located inside the Masjid.

You can also donate your zakat securely online via PayPal. You do not have to have a PayPal account to donate online.




Isha Jamaat: 10:10 pm
Taraweeh: 10:25 pm

Download Full Ramadan Schedule

Dua (Prayer) at the Beginning of the Fast



وَبِصَوْمِ غَدٍ نَّوَيْتَ مِنْ شَهْرِ رَمَضَانَ
Wa bisawmi ghadinn nawaiytu min shahri ramadan
I intend to keep the fast for tomorrow in the month of Ramadan

Dua (Prayer) at the End of the Fast:



Iftar Islamic Center of Orlando Jama Masjid
You and your family are welcome to join us during the entire month of Ramadan to break your fast with us. If you would like to volunteer, donate food, or donate money to help your Muslim brothers and sisters and support our Iftar program please contact the office. The cost is $2,000 per night.

The Messenger of Allah (salallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam) said "Whoever feeds a fasting person will have a reward like that of the fasting person, without any reduction in his reward." [At-Tirmidhi, authenticated by Al-Albani (rahimahullaah).]

We would like to appeal to you to please donate generously to our Ramadan Iftar Program. We hope to continue hosting iftars for years to come--which we can't do without your help.

You can make your donation online via PayPal.

You can make your donation securely online through PayPal. You do not have to have a PayPal account to donate online.

Please click on the appropriate button to make your donation.

Masjid Fund



Zakat



Sadaqah



Iftar



Dawah



Q: What is Ramadan?

A: Ramadan is the name of the ninth Islamic lunar month. It is the month God ordered the Muslims to fast since it was the month He revealed the Quran (the Muslims’ holy scripture) to Muhammad (the final Prophet of God). Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and intimate relations with their spouse during the daylight hours of the blessed month. It is a time for Muslims to contemplate on their belief and increase their faith by actively increasing in worship, prayer and reciting the Qur’an. It is an opportunity for spiritual as well as physical purification.

Q: Do Muslims not eat and drink for a whole month?

A: No. Muslims are ordered to abstain from food, drink and sensual pleasures from the break of dawn until sunset throughout the whole month. This means, that after sunset until the break of dawn of the following day, Muslims may eat and drink as they please. Many Muslims take this opportunity to invite friends and family over to share in the spirit of Ramadan.

Q: What do Muslims do during Ramadan?

A: Muslims usually wake before dawn to take a small meal called “suhoor”. They abstain from eating, drinking and sensual pleasures during the daylight hours of the blessed month. Muslims exert more effort in worship, praying, contemplating, helping others, giving charity, reciting the Quran (the holy book of the Muslims); many Muslims endeavor to complete the Quran’s recitation at least once during the month. At sunset, Muslims break their fast, usually with a big meal with family and friends. Many Muslims also attend the mosque at night, to engage in special night prayers called “taraweeh”.

Q: Is Ramadan a Prophet of Islam?

A: No, Ramadan is not a Prophet of Islam. Ramadan is simply the name of the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calender. It happens to be the month that God revealed the Quran, to Muhammad (the final Prophet of God). Islam believes and honors all the Prophets of the past as servants and Messengers of God, including Noah (Nooh), Abraham (Ibrahim), Moses (Musa) and Jesus (‘Isa), may God send His peace upon them all. Muslims believe that Muhammad is the final Messenger of God, that the previous Messengers prophesized about. He preached the same message as those before him: “Worship God alone, you have no god besides Him”.

Q: Do children, sick and old people need to fast?

A: Fasting is only obligated on Muslims who have reached puberty, are sane and are healthy. So children who have not reached puberty are exempt, but are encouraged to fast some days, or a portion of a day, to train them for when they are obliged to fast. The temporarily sick who have a sickness that may extend a few days, where fasting may severely affect them or prolong their recovery are not obliged to fast but must make up the days after Ramadan. The chronically ill and elderly, for example those with diabetes, are not obliged to fast, but should feed a needy or poor person for each day they miss.

Q: How did the fast during Ramadan become obligatory for Muslims?

A: The revelations from God to the Prophet Muhammad that would eventually be compiled as the Quran began during Ramadan in the year 610, but the fast of Ramadan did not become a religious obligation for Muslims until the year 624. The obligation to fast is explained in the second chapter of the Quran: “O ye who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that ye may (learn) self-restraint… Ramadan is the (month) in which was sent down the Quran, as a guide to mankind, also clear (Signs) for guidance and judgment (between right and wrong). So every one of you who is present (at his home) during that month should spend it in fasting…” (Chapter 2, verses 183 and 185)

Q: What do Muslims believe they gain from fasting?

A: Some of the main benefits of Ramadan are an increased compassion for those in need of the necessities of life, a sense of self-purification and reflection and a renewed focus on spirituality. Muslims also appreciate the feeling of togetherness shared by family and friends throughout the month. Perhaps the greatest practical benefit is the yearly lesson in self-restraint and discipline that can carry forward to other aspects of a Muslim’s life such as work and education.

Q: Why does Ramadan begin on a different day each year?

A: Because Ramadan is a lunar month, it begins about eleven days earlier each year. Throughout a Muslim’s lifetime, Ramadan will fall both during winter months, when the days are short, and summer months, when the days are long and the fast is more difficult. In this way, the difficulty of the fast is evenly distributed between Muslims living in the northern and southern hemispheres.

Q: What is Lailat ul-Qadr?

A: Lailat ul-Qadr (“Night of Power”) marks the anniversary of the night on which the Prophet Muhammad first began receiving revelations from God, through the angel Gabriel. An entire chapter in the Quran deals with this night: “We have indeed revealed this (Message) in the Night of Power: and what will explain to thee what the Night of Power is? The Night of Power is better than a thousand months. Therein come down the angels and the Spirit by God’s permission, on every errand. Peace!…This until the rise of morn.” (Chapter 97) Muslims believe Lailat ul-Qadr is one of the odd-numbered nights in the last ten days of Ramadan.

Q: How can non-Muslim co-workers and friends help someone who is fasting?

A: Employers, co-workers and teachers can help by understanding the significance of Ramadan and by showing a willingness to make minor allowances for its physical demands. Special consideration can be given to such things as requests for vacation time, the need for flexible early morning or evening work schedules and lighter homework assignments. It is also very important that Muslim workers and students be given time to attend Eid prayers at the end of Ramadan. Eid is as important to Muslims as Christmas and Yom Kippur are to Christians and Jews. A small token such as a card (there are Eid cards available from Muslim bookstores) or baked goods given to a Muslim co-worker during Eid ul-Fitr would also be greatly appreciated. Hospital workers should be aware that injections and oral medications might break the fast. Patients should be given the opportunity to decide whether or not their condition exempts them from fasting.

Ramadan Events

Moonsighting

ICO policy regarding the new moon is based on global sighting.

Rules & Etiquettes

Every year, Islamic Center of Orlando needs your help and cooperation to better organize the activities so that we can have a safe and blessed Ramadan.

Parking Rules
  • Do not park your vehicle in someone’s driveway
  • Do not park near fire hydrants located around the masjid
  • Do not block anyone’s vehicle in parking lots
  • Only families with ladies are allowed to park near Ladies entrance
  • Drive slowly and watch for pedestrians and kids
  • Follow the direction of Volunteers, who will be helping with parking
  • Violator’s vehicle will be towed at owner's expense

Etiquettes
  • Trash your paper plates and cups after Iftaar and Dinner
  • No one is allowed to eat inside the Masjid, except for brothers in I’tikaf
  • Control your children during Salah and Taraweeh. It is your responsibility to watch your children for their safety, and to provide a quiet environment for other Musallees
  • Do not talk excessively inside the masjid, especially during salah
  • Please refrain from heated arguments. Mutual respect and love should be exhibited all the time
  • Appreciate and respect the Volunteers

Taraweeh Imam Schedule

Imam Tariq Rasheed

Imam Tariq Rasheed Imam Tariq Rasheed joined the Islamic Center of Orlando in July 1993. He comes from the renowned Ulema of Farangi Mahal of Lucknow, India.

Imam Rasheed received elementary and Middle school education at Christ Church School, a Catholic British school in Lucknow.

1983: Hifz of Quran - Madarsa Furqania, Lucknow, India
1987: Bachelors of Arts in English Literature - University of Lucknow, India
1989: Masters in Arabic Language and Literature - University of Lucknow, India
1992: Conferred the Degree of "Alim" (5 year course) - Darul Uloom Nadwatul Ulema, Lucknow, India
1992: Ijazah of Hadith by Shaikh Abul Hassan Ali Nadwi (R.A.) - Darul Uloom Nadwatul Ulema, Lucknow India
1993: Completed the 1st year of Mufti Course - Darul Uloom Nadwatul Ulema, Lucknow, India
2003: Masters in Educational Leadership - University of Central Florida, Orlando FLCurrently enrolled in the PhD program.

View Full Profile

Hafiz Mahfuz Rahman

Hafiz Mahfuz Rahaman Mahfuz Rahman did Hifz of Qur'an from Darul Hifz in 2003 under the supervision of Imam Tariq Rasheed. After completing his hifz, he continued on to Madrasah Zakariya located in Johannesburg, South Africa for his first year. He then went to Jamiatul Ilm Wal Huda located in Blackburn, England where he completed revising the Qur'an and mastered the tajweed of Qur'an. He received his Sanat from Jamiatul Ilm Wal Huda, Blackburn, England.

Since his return to Orlando in 2008, he has been teaching at Darul Hifz, a full time madrasah along with homeschooling. While teaching at Darul Hifz, he completed his Bachelor's at the University of Central Florida and currently is a student at Louisiana State University where he is completing his Masters in Health Administration.

He has been leading taraweeh since 2004 at many different Masaajids including:
  • Masjid Taqwa - Kissimmee, Florida
  • Masjid Ar-Rahman - Goldenrod, Florida
  • Jama Masjid - Orlando, Florida
  • AMCC - Longwood, Florida

Hafiz Masud Rahman

Masud Rahman completed his Hifz of Quran with Molana Tariq Rasheed in January, 2004. After finishing middle school, he went on to Darul Uloom Zakariyya in Johannesburg, South Africa for revision and to master the recitation of Quran with tajweed.

Masud has led taraweeh since his completion of Hifz in a variety of places:
  • 2004-10 Jama Masjid, Orlando, FL
  • 2011 Darus Salam, Jamaica, NY
  • 2012-13 AMCC, Longwood, FL
  • 2014 Al Amin Center, West Palm Beach, FL
Currently, he's set to attend grad school from the Fall and just received his Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences Pre-Clinical from the University of Central Florida.

Hafiz Usama Abovat

Usama Abovat completed his Hifz of Quran in 2011. After doing revision of the Quran for 1 year, he went to Madrasah Aarabia Islamia Azaadville - a renowned Islamic Seminary in Johannesburg, South Africa - where he is pursuing to be an " Alim", a 6 year course in higher Islamic studies. So far , he has completed 3 years of this course. He is at home in Orlando for the month of Ramadan as this is his annual vacation. He is the eldest son of Hafiz Usman Abovat.

Lailatul Qadr



Lailatul Qadar: The Night of Power

Imagine this. What if your boss told you that if you worked on one specific day, the company would give you 81 years worth of pay? What if you could earn the same amount of money for 81 years of work with just one night of labor? Would you agree to this bargain?

Allah, praised and glorified, has promised His believers an even better deal. Muslims can attain the same amount of blessings and rewards in one night of worship, as they would if they worshipped 1000 regular months. That’s over 81 years. That’s the blessing of Lailatul Qadar.

Lailatul Qadar, translated as the Night of Power, is the greatest night of the year. During this period, Muslims should spend their nights in worship and seek forgiveness, reward, and blessings of Allah.

What Should We Do During Laylatul Qadr?

Here are some recommended things that we should do during laylatul qadr.

Qiyamul Layl: Translated roughly as “Standing for Prayer at Night.” During any other time of the year outside of Ramadan, this prayer is the same as Tahajjud. However, during Ramadan, the Taraweeh prayer replaces Tahajjud, and Qiyamul Layl is a separate prayer Muslims can make at night. It is highly recommended that we make this prayer during Lailatul Qadar.
Dua: Roughly translated as “supplication”, this is an informal prayer in which the Muslim asks Allah for anything he or she may need or want. There is no specific method of making dua, but it is preferred that the Muslim requests blessings upon Prophet Mohammad (peace be up on him), prays for his/her parents, and asks Allah for forgiveness. Allah loves it when His slaves ask Him for things, so asking during lailatul qadr is especially beneficial.
Leaving the mundane: Muslims should decrease their involvement in wordly actions during lailatul qadar. While it’s okay to eat, drink and sleep during the Night of Power, they should refrain from sexual relations and frivolous activities like watching TV or common gossip.

What Does The Quran Say About Laylatul Qadar?

Lailatul Qadar is only directly referenced in one chapter of the Quran. This is chapter 97 which goes by the name Al-Qadr, meaning “The Power.” Though this is a short chapter, it is very profound when we consider the meaning behind the words.

Verily We have sent it down in The Night of Power (Lailatul Qadar)

And what will explain Lailatul Qadar to you?

Lailatul Qadar is better than a thousand months
Therein descend the Angels and the Spirit with the permission of their Lord, with every matter.
Peace therein, until the coming of dawn.

Now, let’s look at this chapter in depth. The following information is based on Ibn Kathir’s explanation of the Quran.

“Verily We have sent it down in the Night of Power.”

“It” in this verse refers to the Quran. Allah tells us that the Quran was sent down during Lailatul Qadar. And we know from previous verses in the Quran, that the Quran was sent down during the month of Ramadan.

Chapter 44, verse 1-4 state: Ha-Mim. By the manifest Book that makes things clear. We sent it down on a blessed night. Verily, We are ever warning. Therein (that night) is decreed every matter with wisdom.

So from this verse, we know that the Quran was sent not just during the month of Ramadan, but specifically during lailatul qadr.

“And what will explain Lailatul Qadar to you? Lailatul Qadar is better than a thousand months.”

Allah explains the Night of Power as only He can. He tells us that Lailatul Qadar is better than a thousand months during which there is no Night of Power. Prophet Mohammed (peace be upon him) stated that whoever is deprived of good on Laylatul Qadr is truly deprived. Our prophet has also stated that whoever stands (prays) during laylatul qadr expecting the reward of Allah, will be forgiven their previous sins.

“Therein descend the Angels and the Spirit with the permission of their Lord, with every matter.”

Because of the magnificent blessings of this night, the angels descend from Heaven. They come down in great numbers with the blessings and mercy of Allah. They visit the believers worshiping Allah whether they are reciting Quran, making dhikr (remembrance) or performing prayer.

“The Spirit” in this verse refers to the angel Jibreel (Gabriel). We can see how important lailatul qadar is if the highest ranking angel of all is descending upon the earth. Angel Jibreel is the one who visited Prophet Muhammad with the first verses of the Quran.

The phrase “with every matter” means that during this night, the matters of life and death, the provisions of every human, is decided during this night. (See the verses from Chapter 44 above.) Truly, what a blessed night to seek the mercy of Allah!

“Peace therein, until the coming of dawn.”

Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) has stated:

“Verily, the month of Ramadan has come to you all. It is a blessed month, which Allah has obligated you all to fast. During it the gates of Paradise are opened, the gates of Hell are closed and the devils are shackled.”

With the gates of Hell closed and the devils locked up, lailatul qadar is full of peace for the Muslims until the dawn. The angels give the worshippers tidings of peace until the dawn. All of it is good and there is no evil until the coming of dawn.

When Is Lailatul Qadar?

The question everyone has is: “When is the Night of Power? Which night is lailatul qadar?”

We already know from the Quranic verses above, that lailatul qadar occurs during the month of Ramadan. A narrative from Aishah (may Allah be pleased with her), the prophet’s wife, states: “when the last ten days of Ramadan began, the Prophet (peace be upon him) would stay up at night, wake his family and tie his lower garment tight.”

So now we know that Lailatul Qadar is during the last ten nights of Ramadan.

There is a statement from Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) that reveals more evidence. He stated:

“Verily I saw Lailatul Qadr, and I was caused to forget it, and indeed it is during the last ten (nights). It is during an odd night and I saw myself as if I were prostrating in mud and water.”

This shows that the Night of Power occurs during the odd numbered nights during the last ten days of Ramadan.

It was recorded that after he made this statement, Prophet Muhammad led his companions in prayer. While they were praying, it began to rain, and after Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) came up from prostration, his forehead was covered in mud and water. One narration states this occurred on the twenty-first nght.

However, another narration states that lailatul qadar may occur during another night.

“Seek it in the last ten (nights) of Ramadan. In the ninth it still remains, in the seventh it still remains, in the fifth it still remains.”

Yet another narration from the companion Ubay Ibn Ka’b states otherwise. When informed that another Ibn Mas’ud (another companion of our prophet) said whoever stands for prayer during the entire year will catch lailatul qadar, Ubay responded: “May Allah have mercy upon him. Indeed he knows that it is during the month of Ramadan and that it is the twenty-seventh night.”

And then the companion Abu Hurayrah reported that Prophet Muhammad stated:

“Verily, it is during the twenty-seventh or the twenty-ninth night. And verily, the angels who are on the earth during that night are more numerous than the number of pebbles.”

And Ubaidah Ibn Samit reported that Prophet Muhammad said:

“Seek it in Ramadan in the last ten nights. For verily, it is during the odd nights, the twenty-first, or the twenty-third, or the twenty-fifth, or the twenty-seventh, or the twenty-ninth, or during the last night.”

So, we can see that while there is ample evidence that Lailatul Qadar occurs during the odd numbered nights of the last ten days of Ramadan, there’s no absolute evidence of the exact night. What is for the Muslim then, is to spend each of the last ten nights involved in worship, hoping to catch the Night of Power.

Several scholars believe that the Night of Power moves about during the last ten nights from year to year, and is not necessarily the same night every year. There appears to be sound evidence for this theory. This gives us even more reason to seek lailatul qadar during each of the last ten nights, instead of just focusing on one particular day.

This night is also a good time to increase our understanding of Islam. This is a good time to learn Quran or memorize a new dua. Even if you only know the basics of Islamic beliefs, you should take advantage of Lailatul Qadar.

And Allah knows best.

Eid-ul-Fitr

EID-UL-FITR is celebrated on the first day of Shaw'waal, at the completion of Ramadan. Shaw'waal is the 10th month of the Islamic calendar. The Eid-al-Fitr is a very joyous day; it is a true Thanksgiving Day for the believing men and women. On this day Muslims show their real joy for the health, strength and the opportunities of life, which Allah has given to them to fulfill their obligation of fasting and other good deeds during the blessed month of Ramadan.

Eid salah starts at 8:30 am sharp. Please come early to find a good parking spot.

Sunnah of Eid

  • Wake up early
  • Prepare for personal cleanliness, take care of details of clothing, etc.
  • Take a Ghusl (bath) after Fajr
  • Brush your teeth
  • Dress up, putting on best clothes available, whether new or cleaned old ones
  • Use perfume (men only)
  • Have breakfast on Eid-al-Fitr before leaving for prayer ground
  • Pay Zakaat-al-Fitr before Salaat-al-Eid (on Eid-al-Fitr)
  • Go to prayer ground early
  • Offer Salaat-al-Eid in congregation in an open place except when whether is not permitting like rain, snow, etc
  • Use two separate route to and from the prayer ground
  • Recite the following Takbir on the way to Salaat and until the beginning of Salaat-al-Eid: Allahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, la ilaaha ill-Allah, Allahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, wa Lillah il-hamd

Duas

Dua (Prayer) at the Beginning of the Fast



وَبِصَوْمِ غَدٍ نَّوَيْتَ مِنْ شَهْرِ رَمَضَانَ
Wa bisawmi ghadinn nawaiytu min shahri ramadan
I intend to keep the fast for tomorrow in the month of Ramadan

Dua (Prayer) at the End of the Fast:



اللَّهُمَّ اِنِّى لَكَ صُمْتُ وَبِكَ امنْتُ [وَعَلَيْكَ تَوَكَّلْتُ] وَعَلَى رِزْقِكَ اَفْطَرْتُ
Allahumma inni laka sumtu wa bika aamantu wa alayka tawakkaltu wa ala rizq-ika-aftartu
O Allah! I fasted for You and I believe in You and I put my trust in You and I break my fast with Your sustenance


Dua of Prophet Yusuf (PBUH):

رَبِّ قَدْ ءَاتَيْتَنِى مِنَ ٱلْمُلْكِ وَعَلَّمْتَنِى مِن تَأْوِيلِ ٱلْأَحَادِيثِ ۚ فَاطِرَ ٱلسَّمَٰوَٰتِ وَٱلْأَرْضِ أَنتَ وَلِىِّۦ فِى ٱلدُّنْيَا وَٱلْءَاخِرَةِ ۖ تَوَفَّنِى مُسْلِمًا وَأَلْحِقْنِى بِٱلصَّٰلِحِينَ

Rabbi qad aataitanee minal mulki wa 'allamtanee min taaweelil ahaadees; faati ras samaawaati wal ardi Anta waliyyee fid dunyaa wal Aakhirati tawaffanee muslimanw wa alhiqnee bissaaliheen

"O my Lord! Thou hast indeed bestowed on me some power, and taught me something of the interpretation of dreams and events,- O Thou Creator of the heavens and the earth! Thou art my Protector in this world and in the Hereafter. Take Thou my soul (at death) as one submitting to Thy will (as a Muslim), and unite me with the righteous."
Quran: 12:101

Photo Gallery

Hafiz Lineup For Ramadan

Islamic Prayer

Imam Tariq Rasheed

Imam Tariq Rasheed joined the Islamic Center of Orlando in July 1993. He comes from the renowned Ulema of Farangi Mahal of Lucknow, India

Hafiz Mahfuzur Rahman

He did Hifz of Qur'an from Darul Hifz in 2003 under the supervision of Imam Tariq Rasheed. After completing his hifz, he continued on to Madarsah Zakariya located in Johannesburg, South Africa

Hafiz Masud Rahman

Masud Rahman completed his Hifz of Quran with Molana Tariq Rasheed in January, 2004. After finishing middle school, he went on to Darul Uloom Zakariyya in Johannesburg, South Africa for revision and to master the recitation of Quran with tajweed

Hafiz Usama Abovat

Usama Abovat completed his Hifz of Quran in 2011. After doing revision of the Quran for 1 year, he went to Madrasah Aarabia Islamia Azaadville - a renowned Islamic Seminary in Johannesburg, South Africa

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